Current News

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Vermont Business Magazine U.S. Senator Peter Welch (D-Vermont), a member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Federal Courts, Oversight, Agency Action, and Federal Rights, released the following statement following reports of two instances where flags bearing symbols carried by violent rioters on January 6 were flown at properties owned by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito: “The call for stronger ethics within the U.S. Supreme Court isn’t new, but it is increasingly necessary after decades of ethical violations that have eroded the public’s trust in this institution. Justice Alito’s apparent embrace of symbols linked to the January 6th insurrection—an attack on our democracy—is the only the most recent example of the highest court’s compromised impartiality. For the sake of the Court’s integrity and credibility, as well as the health of the independent judiciary, Justice Alito should formally recuse himself from cases involving the 2020 election and the January 6 insurrection." 

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by Peter Sterling, REV, Lauren Hierl, VCV, Johanna Miller, VNRC, Ben Edgerly Walsh, VPIRG, Vanessa Rule, 350VT In a dismaying attempt to obstruct Vermont's environmental and economic progress, today Governor Scott vetoed compromise legislation aimed at modernizing the Renewable Energy Standard and setting the state on a path to delivering 100% renewable electricity by 2035. By vetoing H.289, which was supported by nearly all of the state’s electric utilities, along with a host of environmental organizations, business groups and others, Governor Scott is again jeopardizing our state's progress in clean energy and needed climate action as well as threatening to curtail a needed clean energy jobs sector. To override the governor’s veto, the Legislature must vote with a 2/3rds majority at the veto session in mid-June.

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Vermont Business Magazine Governor Phil Scott today, as expected, signed the budget bill into law H.833, while vetoing H.289, An act relating to the Renewable Energy Standard. These were expected. Scott has long voiced his opposition to the renewable bill because of the cost and complexity of how the law could be carried out and the ultimate cost to consumers. Meanwhile, the governor and lawmakers found enough middle ground on the budget for him to sign it into law. He has vetoed the budget in the past. As for the bills he has vetoed, and there could be more coming, the Legislature will hold a "veto session" on June 17. For the renewable bill, the vote will be close whether his veto will be overridden in both chambers.

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Vermont Business Magazine Breeze Airways and Patrick Leahy Burlington International Airport (BTV) proudly announce the launch of non-stop service to Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) and Breeze-Thru service to Jacksonville International Airport (JAX). This marks an exciting milestone for both travelers and the Burlington community. The inaugural flight from Raleigh-Durham to Leahy BTV is scheduled to touch down at 12:07 p.m. EST, with the return flight departing for Raleigh-Durham at 12:52 p.m. EST. This debut flight follows Breeze’s successful launches at Tampa International Airport (TPA) and Orlando International Airport (MCO) on January 31st and February 14th, respectively.

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by Mike Donoghue, Vermont News First, Vermont Business Magazine President Joe Biden said Thursday he intends to nominate Mary Kay Lanthier, the supervisory attorney for the Rutland County Public Defender's Office since 2007, to serve as the US District Court Judge in Vermont. Vermont News First was first to report on Wednesday that Lanthier had recently moved to the head of the line to replace Chief Federal Judge Geoffrey W. Crawford, who is moving to "Senior Status."  Three other lawyers that had been proposed were put on the back burner in recent weeks, while the FBI and Department of Justice vetted Lanthier. Lanthier, 53, of Orwell, began her legal career as a judicial law clerk for the trial courts in Chittenden County and Addison County from 1996 to 1998.  She was an associate at Keiner & Dumont law firm in Middlebury from 1998 to 2000 before becoming a public defender representing indigent people charged in Addison County from 2000 to 2003.

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by Cecilia Larson Community News Service Forged by the American Forest Foundation and the Nature Conservancy, a program that pays people to set aside forest to store carbon has been growing in Vermont over the last two years. The Family Forest Carbon Program launched in 2020 in Pennsylvania, and after learning from the foresters, stakeholders and landowners down there, its organizers migrated north in the summer of 2022 seeking to benefit Vermont communities. Since then, those involved say, close to 500 landowners have expressed interest in enrolling in the program and being paid close to $300 an acre, dispersed over a 20-year period, for preserving the sequestered land. People must own at least 30 acres of naturally growing trees to join.

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Vermont Business Magazine Today, Senator Peter Welch (D-Vt.) announced several of his legislative priorities included in the biennial Water Resources Development Act of 2024 were advanced by the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee with bipartisan support. The legislation will now be considered by the full Senate. The Water Resources Development Act of 2024 (WRDA 2024) authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform vital projects including flood control, water navigation, and ecosystem restoration.

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Vermont Business Magazine At his weekly press conference Wednesday, Governor Phil Scott discussed his decision-making on bills coming to his desk. He highlighted the challenge of balancing benefits, costs and risks, his Administration’s efforts to find compromise, and concerns about the realities of new costs and short timelines for numerous new initiatives coming out of the Legislature. He was joined by Secretary of Natural Resources Julie Moore, who shared some specific examples from this legislative session.

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by Mike Donoghue, Vermont News First, Vermont Business Magazine The supervisory staff attorney at the Rutland County Public Defender’s Office has emerged as the new front runner for possible nomination as the next federal judge for Vermont. The FBI and U.S. Department of Justice have been privately vetting Mary Kay Lanthier, 53, of Orwell in recent weeks, according to four sources who said they were directly aware of the process but were asked not to speak publicly. Sources say she will be named to the federal bench by the White House today. Lanthier, who has been a public defender for more than 20 years, oversees a handful of lawyers who represent indigent defendants in state criminal cases in Rutland County. The advancement of Lanthier means Assistant Federal Defender Steven L. Barth, Vermont Law School Professor Jessica C. Brown and First Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael P. Drescher are now on a back burner, the four sources all independently reported.

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Vermont Business Magazine Burlington-based Teucrium Investment Advisors, LLC and the Board of Trustees of Listed Funds Trust have decided to liquidate the Teucrium AiLA Long-Short Base Metals Strategy ETF. The Fund will cease accepting creation orders on or about June 5, 2024, and shares will stop trading on the NYSE Arca, Inc. prior to market open on June 6, 2024. Liquidation proceeds are expected to be distributed to shareholders on or about June 6, 2024. During the liquidation period, the Fund will deviate from its investment objective and increase its cash holdings. Shareholders should consult their tax advisers regarding the potential tax implications of the liquidation. Shareholders can call (800) 617-0004 for additional information.

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by Cedulie Benoit-Smith, Community News Service Chickens moseyed around the yard of Karen and Brian Wiseman’s Worcester house on a warm May afternoon. But the free-range flock is only one piece of the couple’s homestead just down the road from the town center. The focal point of their business, Peaceful Harvest, instead sits inside a humid, metal-lined room in the barn out back: medicinal mushrooms. The Wisemans grow and process seven species of mushrooms — none of them psychedelic — to turn them into an array of products: powders, tinctures, baggies of dried strips. Some products are blends of species. All of them, the Wisemans say, can boost immune systems, improve memory and energy and spur a range of other healthy body functions. They’re closing in on a decade in business, and their products line the shelves of over 30 co-ops and wellness stores across Vermont — and appear in shops in 10 other states.

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Vermont Business Magazine GasBuddy, the leading fuel savings platform providing North American drivers with the most ways to save money on gas, has released its 2024 Summer Travel Survey results and forecast for Memorial Day travel, revealing a near-record number of Americans planning to road trip this summer as gas prices continue to decline ahead of the holiday weekend. GasBuddy estimates the national average will hold in the mid-$3 per gallon range for much of the summer, with potentially tens of thousands of stations falling below $3 per gallon throughout the next several months. GasBuddy forecasts that gas prices will average $3.58 per gallon nationally between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Right now in Vermont, average gas prices are $3.59 per gallon, down 1 cent from last week. The national average is $3.61, up 1 cent from last week.