Current News

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Vermont Business Magazine Scott Administration officials will be visiting Lamoille County on Monday to continue their county tour to hear from community leaders about their unique infrastructure needs and to discuss the many funding opportunities available to them via federal funding from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) of 2021. Officials will offer guidance on how communities can apply for assistance with tangible economic development, housing, water and sewer, climate change mitigation measures, and broadband projects. While Officials will be using the day for various one-on-one support meetings in Lamoille County, a list of events open to the media and public are sorted by Agency or Department below.

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by Karen Colberg Vermont businesses large and small are pillars of our local communities: providing goods and services, offering local employment opportunities, contributing to the local economy, and advocating for the well-being of our people. Ensuring our current workforce and their families have what they need is more than just good business – it’s about creating a thriving future for our communities and state. By supporting kids’ physical, mental and emotional development today through proper nutrition, we are investing in tomorrow’s workers and leaders. It is our job to care for our state’s students, so students can focus on their job — showing up to class able to concentrate and ready to learn all they need to become the skilled and creative people who will power Vermont’s future. It’s simple: no student should learn what hunger feels like at school.

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Vermont Business Magazine The Lake Champlain Chamber (LCC) has announced a call for nominations for its annual business and community awards. Businesses and individuals are encouraged to nominate candidates for the following awards: Business of the Year; A. Wayne Roberts Business Award; Emerging Leader Award; Workforce Innovation Award; Community Impact Award.

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Vermont Business Magazine Meg York JD’15, professor and Family Law Project lead attorney and Jill Martin Diaz, professor and Vermont Immigrant Assistance (VIA) lead attorney, both part of the South Royalton Legal Clinic (SRLC) at Vermont Law and Graduate School, have been named as two of the 40 Best LGBTQ+ Lawyers Under 40 in 2023 by the National LGBTQ+ Bar Association. Each year, 40 LGBTQ+ legal professionals under the age of 40 are recognized by the LGBTQ+ Bar for demonstrating a profound commitment to LGBTQ+ equality in their field. York and Martin Diaz are among a distinguished group of lawyers receiving this award; both identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community, extending their advocacy within this community and respective legal fields.

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Vermont Business Magazine Patient Choices Vermont (PCV) is pleased to announce the settlement of a lawsuit filed last August challenging the constitutionality of the Vermont residency requirement in our medical-aid-in-dying law (Act 39). The settlement means that plaintiff Lynda Shannon Bluestein, a terminally ill cancer patient from Connecticut, will now have access to medical-aid-in-dying services in Vermont. The settlement further stipulates that Vermont officials will support removal of the residency requirement from the law.

Act 39, adopted in May 2013, enables terminally ill Vermonters who are capable of making their own medical decisions, to request and receive medication to bring about a hastened death at a time of their choosing. Act 39, like similar medical-aid-in-dying laws in other states, currently makes end-of-life choice only available to Vermont state residents.

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Leonine Public Affairs The budget adjustment bill was delivered to Governor Phil Scott on Tuesday. He has until Monday to act on the bill and there is much anticipation about whether he will sign or veto. He has raised concerns that the legislature included $50 million more than he had originally proposed. If he vetoes the bill, it will be the first test of the Democratic supermajority in the Legislature, and would set the tone for other disagreements between the two branches of government over spending and policy proposals currently being developed in the State House. The House Ways and Means Committee approved H.66, which would provide up to 12 weeks of paid leave for workers at 90 percent of their salary to care for a newborn and some other personal matters. The program would cost $112 million to start, $117 million annually, and would be paid for with payroll tax split between the employer and the employee.

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by Jennifer Nachbur, The Robert Larner, M.D. College of Medicine, UVM Energized and costumed in “under the sea” themed outfits, headbands, and trinkets, members of the medical Class of 2023 enjoyed an upbeat, emotional, and life-changing Match Day in the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine’s Hoehl Gallery on March 17. The 113 students participating were among a record-breaking nearly 43,000* future physicians taking part in the National Resident Matching Program’s (NRMP) 2023 Main Residency Match. Of the Class of 2023 medical students participating, 42 were matched into primary care residencies (internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics). Class members matched at 77 different institutions across 29 states, with eight students matching to residencies at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

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Vermont Business Magazine National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) is seeking input on how to structure nearly $2.7 billion in grant programs to ensure everyone in America has the digital skills and devices they need to realize the full potential of high-speed Internet access. The goal of the Digital Equity Act’s $1.44 billion State Digital Equity Capacity Grant Program and the $1.25 billion Competitive Digital Equity Program is to promote adoption and meaningful use of the Internet among underrepresented communities and populations, including low-income households, veterans, aging individuals, racial and ethnic minorities, rural residents, and others. The Vermont Community Broadband Board (VCBB) has been appointed to administer Vermont’s Digital Equity Act programs.

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Vermont Business Magazine The Children’s Literacy Foundation (CLiF), a Vermont-based nonprofit, is marking three significant milestones in April. It is celebrating 25 years of service to the children of Vermont and New Hampshire under the guidance of founding executive director Duncan McDougall. It is announcing McDougall’s retirement and the selection of Laura Rice as just the second executive director in the nonprofit organization’s history. And it is moving into a new, purpose-built headquarters in Waterbury Center. McDougall founded the nonprofit in his garage in Waterbury Center in 1998. Since then, CLiF has grown into a regionally-recognized, award-winning organization that has provided inspiring, free literacy programs to 375,000 under-resourced young readers and writers in 430 communities across Vermont and New Hampshire and given away more than $10 million in new, high-quality books to children in shelters and low-income housing, refugee, foster, and migrant children, children in rural communities with limited resources, children of incarcerated adults, and many others.

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Vermont Business Magazine Ben & Jerry's thank you to fans is back. Free scoops will be handed out across the world to thank fans for their on-going support. Cones at the ready, it promises to be bigger than ever on Monday, April 3, 2023. It was springtime in Vermont on May 5, 1979 when the two cofounders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield surprised themselves outlasting a long winter in Vermont, with an average temperature below freezing all season. To celebrate their first year in business and thank the local community for their support, the co-founders decided to open the doors and scoop free ice cream. It wasn't just a taste. It wasn't just one flavor. It was all the ice cream the duo could churn out. They called it "Free Cone Day" – and just like that… an annual celebration was born.

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Vermont Business Magazine Dotdash Meredith's FOOD & WINE announces its 2023 Drinks Innovators of the Year, recognizing nine people leading the drinks world right now with extraordinary creativity and ambition. Some, like the winemaker making exceptional wines in a climate on the very edge of where grapes can be grown, and the distiller transforming an invasive species into bourbon, are addressing climate change with creativity and verve. ​This includes Deirdre Heekin and her winery, La Garagista​ in Woodstock, Vermont. ​​Others, like South Africa’s first Black woman winemaker, and the San Diego brewer celebrating Latino culture in craft-brewing, are bringing their life experiences and stories to the table in liquid terms.

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Vermont Business Magazine Family-owned company Lake Champlain Chocolates (LCC), known for their award-winning chocolate confections and commitment to Fair Trade ingredients, is excited to release their new Plant-Based Truffle Bars, free of palm oil, artificial ingredients, and GMOs. These vegan truffle bars offer all the creaminess of milk chocolate without the dairy. The Plant-Based Truffle Bars are available in five flavors including Cinnamon, Cold Brew Coffee, Sea Salt Caramel, Raspberry, and Peppermint. Born from a dare to do better, Jim Lampman founded Lake Champlain Chocolates, beginning the journey of making hand-rolled, creamy truffles crafted with local Vermont ingredients. Fast forward almost 40 years later, and Lake Champlain Chocolates' truffle-making is still going strong and has evolved to include plant-based truffle bars that everyone can enjoy.