Report: Vermont's infrastructure needs major improvements

-A A +A

Report: Vermont's infrastructure needs major improvements

Tue, 02/21/2012 - 9:26am -- tim

Today, the Vermont Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) released the first report of its kind in Vermont, the Report Card for Vermont’s Infrastructure. The Report Card provides an evaluation and letter grade for Vermont’s roads, bridges, dams, municipal drinking water and municipal wastewater systems. Of the five areas of infrastructure, grades ranged from a ‘C’ to a ‘D-’, with roads and municipal wastewater scoring the lowest.

‘Infrastructure plays a significant role in the everyday life of the citizens of Vermont,’ said Bernie Gagnon, president of the Vermont Section of ASCE. ‘We need to improve these grades in order to sustain and grow our economy.’
The study provides a state-focused report, modeled after the ASCE Report Card on America’s Infrastructure, which examines the nation’s infrastructure and rates the overall infrastructure as deserving a ‘D.’ This report highlights the condition of Vermont’s infrastructure so that the public and policy makers can make informed decisions on funding our critical assets.
‘For the first time, the citizens of Vermont have a clear evaluation of their state’s critical infrastructure conditions,’ said Andrew W. Herrmann, P.E., SECB, F.ASCE, president of ASCE. ‘This report shows that the state’s roads, bridges and water systems need to be made a priority.’
Several professional civil engineers registered in the state of Vermont with significant infrastructure expertise volunteered many hours to produce this study. They analyzed technical reports, inspection records, budgets, maintenance schedules and other documents to arrive at letter grades for the five areas of infrastructure. Experts looked at the physical conditions of the infrastructure areas, and studied funding sources and trends that impact maintenance and upgrades. In nearly every area, lack of funding was cited as a reason for poor physical conditions.
ASCE developed the Report Card to create a fact-based assessment of the state’s infrastructure in one consolidated document. Another goal of the effort is to give political leaders the ability to compare and contrast grades on different categories of infrastructure, to advise them on ways to improve grades and to help them make better decisions on where to commit resources.
To read the Report Card in its entirety, visit www.vtasce.org.
Founded in 1852, the American Society of Civil Engineers represents more than 140,000 civil engineers worldwide and is America’s oldest national engineering society. For more information, visitwww.asce.org.
The Vermont Section of ASCE consists of more than 350 civil engineers and recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. 
 
ASCE 2.21.2012